Planned Departure – Leave memories … not a mess

Planned Departure is all about planning well in life so that you leave memories and not a mess!

It is about starting the conversation and answering some important questions such as:

  • Is your life plan ready?
  • How do you want to plan for your family?
  • Offer the best education?
  • Or gift them happiness?
  • Or hope things will eventually fall in place?
  • Have you taken any financial advice?
  • Do you have life insurance or critical illness cover?
  • Or Do you have a Will in place?
  • Have you started the important conversation?
  • Such as where all your documents are?
  • Or shared your secret recipe?
  • Does your family know your assets and investments?
  • Or your liabilities!
  • Are they aware of important online accounts?
  • Can your family find everything they need?
  • Even when you are not around?
  • Will you leave them CHAOS ? Or Mess?
  • Or Will you leave them memories?
  • Have you planned for everything? or anything?

Now you can!!

With Planned Departure,

  • Organise scattered information in one place.
  • Leave clear instructions.
  • Put everything in order.
  • Ensure everything is there even when you are not.

We can help you avoid the mess

So that you can focus on creating memories.
Planned Departure – Leave memories… not a mess!

Sign up now and start planning.

Happy New Year

Happy New Year
Happy New Year

We would like to wish all our readers a happy and prosperous 2016.

Please continue to support us by sharing our content and inviting others to join our platform.

Start planning now in the new year.

Ask your adviser – Part 1

Financial Planning, Equity release

At Planned Departure, we believe in empowering people by educating and guiding them about life planning and legacy.

With this in mind, I am beginning to write a new series. The idea is to empower people to ask the right questions when going for financial advise. My notes are simple and easy to understand. I have tried not to use jargons unless absolutely necessary. Please send me your feedback, likes or dislikes.

What is “Equity Release”?

It is a financial arrangement / contract by which you can sell a part or whole of your house / property and still remain to stay in that house / property without paying any rent. You will however pay all other expenses relating to the house / property. In this process, you can receive cash upfront or as a monthly pension for as long as you are alive. After your death, the part or whole of your house / property is legally transferred to the other party in the contract. This other party is usually an insurance company.

Please ask the following questions for an informed decision making.

1. What is the type of arrangement he/she is proposing?

  • E.g. Lifetime mortgage
  • Interest only mortgage
  • Home reversion
  • Shared appreciation mortgage
  • Home Income plan
  • UK Equity release schemes

2. What is the

  • Valuation of your property on which you are signing the contract
  • LTV (Loan to Value) of the mortgage (to ascertain amount of Equity being released)
  • Amount of annuity being purchased (if you are opting for monthly pensions)
  • Interest rate levied (for upfront cash receipts)

Please remember that

  • You will have the right to live there as long as you are alive and also be responsible for all costs associated with the property.
  • If you have chosen to take upfront cash, you can use it as you wish. Perhaps, go for a World Tour?
  • You can also refinance in the years to come, if interest rates fall drastically.
  • You are reducing or completely eliminating the possibility of your family inheriting your asset after you have died, especially if the appreciation of your asset is slower than the rate of interest on your contract.

Note: Please do not treat this as financial advice.

State Pension changes in 2016 – can I top up my pension?

Financial Planning, Retirement planning
Retirement Planing

We, at Planned Departure believe that planning is a continuous process and legacy is just a part of it.  An important part of planning is taking care of pensions. Recently, there has been some changes in the State Pension. In this post our adviser partner Mr. Richard Hawkings explains what this initiative is and how it will affect individuals.

A new initiative allows people who reach the state pension age before April 2016, to top up their pension. This includes those that are already drawing the state pension. The Government is allowing retirees to buy extra state pension by paying so-called Class 3A voluntary National Insurance contributions between October 2015 and April 2017.

How will it help?

This will help people reaching state pension age before April 2016 who will not receive the new flat-rate state pension.

Some retirees will be better off under the new system (e.g. women and the self-employed) and the top-up will allow pensioners retiring before that date, and who may feel that they are missing out, a chance to build up a higher future state pension income. Among those who probably won’t achieve the equivalent of the flat-rate state pension of around £151, and will be interested in the top-ups, are people who’ve had career breaks and not paid NI for the full number of years and women bringing up children who’ve missed out on the additional state pension.

How much extra will be paid?

How much you’ll pay for the extra state pension will depend on your age, with the cost falling as your age increases and your life expectancy falls. The maximum extra pension you can buy is £25 per week, thus:

– At age 65 increasing your pension by £1 per week will cost £890, or £22,250 for an extra £25 per week;
– At 70, the cost is £779 for an extra £1 per week, or £19,475 for £25 per week;
– At 75, the cost is £674 for an extra £1 per week, or £16,850 for £25 per week;
– At 80, the cost is £544 for an extra £1 per week, or £13,600 for £25 per week.

How to make an extra purchase?

Making the extra pension purchase can be done either online or by telephone, using a one-off direct debit, online banking transfer or by sending a cheque. Your weekly state pension will increase with immediate effect, although there’s a 90-day ‘cooling-off’ period, during which you can change your mind and get your money refunded, less any payments you’ve already received.

Get in touch with Richard Now

Sources: http://www.which.co.uk (Article: 2015/10/10)

NOTE: Please do not treat this as financial advice.

About the Author:

Financial Adviser , Financial Planner
Richard Hawkings

 

I have been a Lifestyle Financial Planner / Independent Financial Adviser since 1998. My role is to help clients identify, achieve and maintain their desired lifestyle, without the fear of running out of money, whatever happens ! I help clients and businesses plan their future with regards to their Pensions, Investments, Life cover, Shareholder Protection, Keyman cover, Workplace Pensions.

 

Is your life plan ready?

Infographic on planning at different stages in life.

What I learnt from my father’s experience and from my own is that it is very important to plan. 

And, Planning is not a static exercise it is dynamic.

Our circumstances change and so do our needs. Each stage in life requires different kind of protection and planning. I have tried to put down different needs and protection at different stages. Hope you find it useful too!

Life Plan, Financial Planning, Future Planning
Life Planning

NOTE: Please do not treat this as financial advice.

The Second International Death Online Research Symposium – Summary of the first day!

I had the privilege of attending The Second International Death Online Research Symposium, held at the Kingston University, London, UK on August 17th – 18th, 2015. It was good to meet others, who like us, are researching death in the digital age.

Death Online Research is a network of international researchers interested in the study of how dying, death and the afterlife is mediated and expressed online. The network statement reminds me of the reasons why Planned Departure was created

“When an increasingly large part of life, from the most intimate to the most officious is manifest online, it should be of no surprise that death is there as well. We are able to relate to death online in different ways, e.g. before and after an actual physical death, or in more metaphorical ways within online forums, gaming environments and so on. Alongside the social media conversations, we have sites for mourning and remembrance as well as for legal advice, casket sale and funeral services. As the median age of Internet population continues to go up, matters connected to the physical death will have increasing importance…’

This event had many different aspects related to digital death. However, there was one common theme in most of the findings from research, which was explained by Dorthe in her opening keynote – Many death related practices are actually the online part of a larger picture counting both on and offline practices and being related to socio-cultural practices in all kinds of settings and contexts.

After Dorthe’s keynote, next section of the conference was on (Re)mediating death and bereavement .

This panel session was started by Katrin Doeveling from the University of Leipzig  and she discussed how online bereavement differs depending on the loss. She also highlighted the need for platforms like this and support provided by these platforms.

IMG_4458Online bereavement platforms provide opportunities for emotional communication within a group of like-minded, yet anonymous grievers.

In the next session, Anna Haverinen from the university of Turku discussed identities and how identity of the deceased and the bereaved is discovered in the process of creating memorial website. It was very interesting to understand that memorials are like caricatures highlighting only one or a few aspects of the individuals. It solidifies our belief that except deceased, no one else really knows how deceased would have liked to be remembered.

IMG_4471I really liked the next session from Dick Kasperowski and Kjetil Sandvik about the bereaved parents and the need to de-tabooisation of talking about death and specifically death of a children.

This talk was followed by the talk of Jo Bell on the experience of bereaved in the aftermath of  a suicide. She found that platforms like Facebook provided an excellent platform to support vulnerable people and to increase awareness and raise more funds for the suicide prevention.

IMG_4472Next few sessions were on the use of technology in this space. It was interesting to see the use of augmented reality apps for gravestone, new digital memorial platforms in Denmark and competitors of Planned Departure, all the way from Israil.

We believe that all these platforms will eventually make it easier for people to talk about death in the digital age!

Final session of this action packed day was from Vared (Rose) Shavit, who is an independent researcher on the topic of digital death. Rose highlighted the problem clearly with the results of er survey which were presented in a paper titled – “Online Legacies : Online Service Providers and the Public – a Clear Gap” 

IMG_4512This session was excellent and gave us opportunity to discuss the solutions we currently have in the market to address this problem and ways in which these solutions could be enhanced. It was good to see that the product road map we have in place is in line with the enhancements people are looking for! However, everybody agreed that more than anything else, we need to increase awareness about the complexities of dying in the digital age!

Second day of this conference was equally amazing and gave a lot more insight about digital death! Stay tuned for the next post and please share this summary with people who couldn’t attend this conference!