Facebook as an Asset?

Fascebook is an asset

            We all know Facebook to be an online social networking site that enables us to

connect and stay in touch with family and friends all over the world. It was founded in

2004 and over the years has evolved from just keeping family and friends in touch to

different platform all together. You can now join groups with members with the same

interest as you, find job vacancies and advertise and market your business.

But did you know your Facebook account is an asset to you as an individual?

         I am sure most of you didn’t. I myself didn’t know till recently when I accidentally

changed  my personal profile to a fan page. I instantly thought I had lost everything.

Now I have been a member of Facebook since 2008. I have uploaded pictures,

shared and been tagged in various pictures and posts since then. I did not know

that Facebook was an online archive and album for me. Pictures of the birth of my

god-children, nephews, nieces, graduation and concerts are all on there. But I never

valued them as much as I should till I thought I had lost them for good with the switch

of the pages but luckily Facebook support team came to my rescue and restored the

page from a fan page to a profile again and that is when I realised. In a blink of an

eye all those memories had vanished. I had not stored them on an online drive or a

drive at home but had the chance to now.

           With PlannedDeparture, you have the chance to store all these memories. All your

relevant information regarding your Facebook; passwords, security questions and

your pictures can all be saved in your E-vault. You and your delegated beneficiaries

can have access to this information anytime. You can read more about ‘ What is the value of my digital photographs ?’ here

         Storing those memories can be helpful to you and those around you whenever it is

needed. So why not try us out today.

Imagesource: http://www.dbswebsite.com/blog/2011/11/30/social-media-101-benefits-best-practices/

 

Author: Planned Departure

Living and working in this digital era, our social media accounts – from Facebook, Twitter, Flickr to the likes of Pinterest – are increasing not only in number but also in volume. Additionally, many of us have domain names registered and libraries of movies, digital music and e-Books that can be of significant value. And let's not forget about Bitcoin and other virtual currencies! For the majority of us, these accounts and digital assets are likely to outlive us. And when we die, it is left up to family members and estate executors to sift through them all. Furthermore, even though they may have all the required passwords necessary for these accounts, many heirs will discover that they have no clear authority to access, or even to manage, the online accounts of their deceased loved ones. With the value of individuals' digital assets globally measured in the hundreds of billions of dollars, planning for the protection of our digital assets has moved to centre stage. It is essential that our online and social media accounts are included as part of the estate planning process. Failure to do so may not only deprive those we leave behind of fond memories and (possibly) a little nest egg, it could also leave us vulnerable to postmortem identity theft if fraudsters get to use our personal details to apply for credit facilities whilst our accounts remain unguarded. Planned Departure resolves these issues. We provide you with the ability not only to protect your digital assets, but also to clearly indicate who can access your online accounts and who should benefit from them. Create piece of mind today by registering with us in one quick and easy process.

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