Planned Departure – Leave memories … not a mess

Planned Departure is all about planning well in life so that you leave memories and not a mess!

It is about starting the conversation and answering some important questions such as:

  • Is your life plan ready?
  • How do you want to plan for your family?
  • Offer the best education?
  • Or gift them happiness?
  • Or hope things will eventually fall in place?
  • Have you taken any financial advice?
  • Do you have life insurance or critical illness cover?
  • Or Do you have a Will in place?
  • Have you started the important conversation?
  • Such as where all your documents are?
  • Or shared your secret recipe?
  • Does your family know your assets and investments?
  • Or your liabilities!
  • Are they aware of important online accounts?
  • Can your family find everything they need?
  • Even when you are not around?
  • Will you leave them CHAOS ? Or Mess?
  • Or Will you leave them memories?
  • Have you planned for everything? or anything?

Now you can!!

With Planned Departure,

  • Organise scattered information in one place.
  • Leave clear instructions.
  • Put everything in order.
  • Ensure everything is there even when you are not.

We can help you avoid the mess

So that you can focus on creating memories.
Planned Departure – Leave memories… not a mess!

Sign up now and start planning.

Digital Assets Postmortem – Probate versus Policy

Death in Cyberspace could have been taken directly from a Flash Gordon comic strip: Flash Gordon in combat with Ming the Merciless, the evil ruler of the planet Mongo.

It’s a bit more serious than that but, nonetheless, it makes for an interesting story.

Digital death is becoming an expanding area of law that is attracting considerable comment and interest from a plethora of parties. Much of this interest has stemmed from the media’s capitalising on the frenzy surrounding social media sites (such as Facebook) and the deaths of account holders. Parents, on the one hand, are demanding access to their deceased child’s account while the social networks argue the issue of privacy and the Terms and Conditions agreed at the time of opening an account.

Some progress has been made, with Facebook implementing its “memorialising” feature, allowing friends and families to request that a decedent’s account become effectively frozen whilst still providing access by family and friends.

Yet this amenity fails to resolve more substantive issues created by a digital passing, such as who can dictate the fate of a loved one’s account, over what time period should a memorialised presence be maintained and whether memorialisation is what the decedent would truly have wanted.

A death in cyberspace is a novel issue for many lawyers and presents some interesting challenges that society as a whole hasn’t fully come to grips with. It’s a quiet revolution that is rapidly coming to the probate and estate planning world.

Aside from social media accounts there are many other digital assets that are creating equally difficult issues.

Take for example your website. Is it hosted in the UK, in an Asian or European country, or perhaps in the USA? And what about your email accounts? Where are they held? In the event you become permanently disabled or you die, which country’s property laws apply?

And then there are issues relating to online payment accounts, virtual currencies and reward cards. Online payment mechanisms such as e-Bay, PayPal and Amazon will usually have traditional bank accounts linked to them, so it might be unlikely that cash balances will exist in the online accounts. However, this will definitely not be the case in every situation, requiring attorneys and executors to thoroughly check the online accounts for pending refunds and credits.

The situation with online accounts can be made even more difficult if the email address of the account holder is unknown. Often with no physical address and communication being made only by email (often to an enquiries@ address), dealing with these entities is generally more difficult than dealing with high street banks.

Additionally, with the increasing numbers of online-only banks beginning to emerge, attorneys’ and executors’ ability to continue to manage such accounts digitally may will depend on the terms and conditions of the bank.

Reward cards are a common inclusion in most people’s wallets and will include those from supermarkets, fuel companies, airlines and hotels. Whether or not the value of these schemes can be used by an attorney on behalf of an adult, or transferred after death, depends on the organisation administering the scheme.

Some of the big supermarkets provide for rewards to be transferrable on death, but other organisations – such as airlines and hotel groups – state that loyalty points that are unused at the time of death will be cancelled, together with membership of the scheme.

As the digital asset stakes in the cyberworld continue to rise, the challenge of finding a standard dispositional protocol for these assets may face competing power extremes. On one side of this continuum we have traditional property law, often adequately covered in probate. On the other side, however, we have corporate policy, manifested typically as a User Agreement or Terms of Service.

Contrary to what these extremes might suggest in terms of the best solutions to the issues raised by digital death, viable compromise solutions do not yet exist between these two legal extremes. One way forward would be to find a mid-continuum solution lying somewhere between probate law and corporate contractual policy that would serve the greatest number of societal interests.

Dealing with digital assets under a power of attorney or a Will can present challenges and will be an area of the law that attracts a lot of media attention.

Even though many digital assets may have more of an emotional or sentimental significance rather than financial value, it is an area of law that is beginning to raise new challenges for legal advisers and probate lawyers.

Meet the Team

We would like to say a ‘BIG THANK YOU’

We have been keeping our heads down at Planned Departure from past few months and have made steady progress. Some of the things we have done so far are –

* We have grown the team size to 7.
* We have moved to our office at Vista Business Centre.
* We have been signing B2B partnership with wills and probate lawyers.
* We got covered in prestigious media outlets such as The Economic Times.
* Our crowdfunding campaign on Seedrs is launched and we are moving nicely towards our goal.
* We have secured investment from friends, family and professional investors.
* We are launching our new, sleek and revamped UI.

All this was possible because of the support and encouragement from our friends, family, professors from LBS and our investors.

We had the opportunity to say thanks and showcase our revamped UI.
For those that couldn’t make it, there will be another event soon so would be glad to see you then.

Thanks again.

Are your virtual goods and property valuable?

value

Did you know there were different types of digital properties you could acquire?

We might not be able to physically hold on to our digital possessions but they exist and like all other properties they have their value and rights to them. Some have emotional value and some have financial value.

Games like World of Warcraft or Runsescape and others have players that spend days and hours acquiring weapons, skills potions and points for their virtual character. These items can later be sold in the real world for real money.                                                                     Example, a big battle bear in World of Warcraft costs $109.00

Itunes accounts, paypal accounts, amazon accounts, travel points etc often have saved up credit and points which can later be redeemed as cash, used to buy more goods or used as vouchers and gift cards. For example, I have air miles account and with my avios air mile points, I can buy free experience, buy cheaper tickets and so on. These air mile points are my virtual assets – but they have real world benefits and values attached with these.

My cousin bought a Dell laptop last week with her bitcoins. Some companies now are accepting bitcoins as form of payments. Now transactions are being performed without the need for a central bank which is quite convenient.

Sony allows people that buy their games to sell their property.

If you like to download music, movies, games, books, software’s, apps and academic papers which some are governed by licensing agreements which allow only the individuals that downloaded them to have access to them for it to be used only. Which means due to copyright protection, if anything happens to you, there will be a lot of challenging restrictions in terms of the material being transferred.

Your credit cards, bitcoins, business cards can all be kept in your  virtual wallet which can later be accessed by your beneficiaries with the right information.

With PlannedDeparture all of this will be taking care of. With the list of beneficiaries in your E-vault explain what happens to what, everything will be taken care of and all your property will not be locked away but given to those you think deserve, need or will appreciate it as much as you.

Protect your virtual goods, sign up with PlannedDeparture.

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